One autonomous vehicle can control the flow of at least 20 human-controlled vehicles around it.
Mixed autonomous and standard vehicle experiments with 21 or 22 vehicles on a circular track in Tucson, Arizona.

846

Tucson, Arizona,
United States
Identifier
2017-01165
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Los Angeles Congestion Reduction Demonstration ExpressLanes Program: National Evaluation Report

Summary Information

The Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana metro area is home to 13 million people and has the second highest population density in the United States. The region has the most extensive freeway system in the United States, in addition to a comprehensive public transit system. The area is one of the most congested areas in the United States.

The Los Angeles (LA) Congestion Reduction Demonstration (CRD) projects included:

Tolling: Converting HOV lanes and restriping created dynamically-priced HOT lanes; the 11-mile ExpressLanes on I-110 opened on November 10, 2012 and the 14-mile ExpressLanes on I-10 opened on February 23, 2013. Tolls range from $0.25 to $1.40 per hour, depending on congestion, paid with an electronic FasTrak transponder.

Parking Management: LA Express Park is an integrated parking management system that relies on state-of-the-art parking sensors, parking meters, and parking guidance technologies, as well as advanced analytical capabilities.

Transit: Increased frequency of bus rapid transit (BRT), additional transit signal priority (TSP) deployment, and capital improvements.

Travel Demand Management: Formation of new vanpools.

Findings

It is not necessary for all vehicles to be automated to benefit from mobile actuation of an autonomous vehicle controller. A single autonomous vehicle can control the flow of at least 20 human-controlled vehicles around it, with substantial reductions in velocity standard deviation, excessive braking, and fuel consumption.

Goal Areas
Deployment Locations