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Wrong-way crashes are a nationwide problem. Despite being relatively rare events, these types of crashes are more likely to be deadly. In Arizona, from 2004 to 2014, 25 percent of all wrong way crashes were fatal. To tackle, this the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) started focusing on the use of technology and other countermeasures to reduce the risk of wrong-way crashes, and designed an integrated, corridor-level system with three main goals that were as follows: a) Detecting and tracking wrong-way vehicles, b) Alerting both wrong-way drivers and other motorists who could be in danger, and c) Notify law enforcement.

A 15-mile segment of I-17 in metro Phoenix was selected as the corridor for the wrong-way vehicle detection system pilot project and became operational in January 2018. This corridor had the highest potential for future wrong-way incursions, based on the historical number of wrong-way vehicle crashes along that corridor. The pilot system was designed to utilize existing power and communication systems along I-17. The pilot system used 90 thermal cameras positioned throughout the 15-mile corridor to detect wrong-way vehicles; wrong-way signs with flashing LED lights to alert wrong-way drivers; and dynamic message sign (DMS) advisories to warn right-way drivers.

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Wrong-way crashes are a nationwide problem. Despite being relatively rare events, these types of crashes are more likely to be deadly. In Arizona, from 2004 to 2014, 25 percent of all wrong way crashes were fatal. To tackle, this the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) started focusing on the use of technology and other countermeasures to reduce the risk of wrong-way crashes, and designed an integrated, corridor-level system with three main goals that were as follows: a) Detecting and tracking wrong-way vehicles, b) Alerting both wrong-way drivers and other motorists who could be in danger, and c) Notify law enforcement. A 15-mile segment of I-17 in metro Phoenix was selected as the corridor for the wrong-way vehicle detection system pilot project and became operational in January 2018. This corridor had the highest potential for future wrong-way incursions, based on the historical number of wrong-way vehicle crashes along that corridor. The pilot system was designed to utilize existing power and communication systems along I-17. The pilot system used 90 thermal cameras positioned throughout the 15-mile corridor to detect wrong-way vehicles; wrong-way signs with flashing LED lights to alert wrong-way drivers; and dynamic message sign (DMS) advisories to warn right-way drivers.

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Arizona DOT
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Title
Interstate 17 Wrong Way Vehicle Detection Pilot Program
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