Author
Kazazi, Juela; Susann Winkler; and Mark Vollrath
Benefit Summary HTML

Driver warning systems are a tool in the pursuit of safer urban areas due to the high complexity of the environment, this may be even more of an issue for older drivers as they are over-represented in crashes. The aim of this driving simulator study was to determine whether a heads-up warning showing either a stop sign warning (SW) or caution sign warning (CW) 2.5 seconds prior to the anticipated crash would have a better effect on the driving performance of older drivers (compared to the control group) in scenarios of different criticalities.
Thirty-six older drivers (average age of 71.9, average 49.7 years driving experience) were divided into three groups: SW, CW, and a control. Each participant drove through four scenarios.

  • Pedestrian 1 scenario: while turning a pedestrian crosses the vehicle’s path.
  • Pedestrian 2 scenario: a pedestrian, obscured by parking cars, suddenly crosses the vehicle path.
  • Vehicle scenario: lead vehicle comes to a sudden stop.
  • Obstacle scenario: driver is confronted with a hay bale hidden behind a hill.

In each scenario the vehicle driven by the participant travels through a simulated urban road and has to make a turn when indicated by a voice output and an arrow in the speedometer. After the test drive, each subject was asked about the criticality and surprise of each scenario.
Driving data was logged by the simulation software. Participant’s subjective data was converted to a rating on a scale from 1 to 15.

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Lesson Background HTML

Driver warning systems are a tool in the pursuit of safer urban areas. Older drivers my especially benefit as they are over-represented in urban crashes. The aim of this driving simulator study was to determine whether a heads-up warning showing a stop sign warning (SW) or caution sign warning (CW) 2.5 seconds prior to the anticipated crash would have a better effect on the driving performance of older drivers (compared to the control group) in scenarios of different criticalities. Thirty-six older drivers (average age of 71.9, average 49.7 years driving experience) were divided into three groups: SW, CW, and a control. Each participant drove through four scenarios.

  • Pedestrian 1 scenario: while turning a pedestrian crosses the vehicle’s path.
  • Pedestrian 2 scenario: a pedestrian, obscured by parking cars, suddenly crosses the vehicle path.
  • Vehicle scenario: lead vehicle comes to a sudden stop.
  • Obstacle scenario: driver is confronted with a hay bale hidden behind a hill.

In each scenario the vehicle driven by the participant travels through a simulated urban road and has to make a turn when indicated by a voice output and an arrow in the speedometer. After the test drive, each subject was asked about the criticality and surprise of each scenario. Driving data was logged by the simulation software. Participant’s subjective data was converted to a rating on a scale from 1 to 15.

Pages
12
Publication Sort Date
Publisher
2015 Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Europe Chapter Annual Meeting
Result Type
Reviewer
Source ID
1576
Title
Towards developing a head-up display warning system - How to support older drivers in urban areas?
UNID
7A54FE350FE40C3385257F8C005C2C65
Source Review
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