Author
Kim, Hyungil, et.al.
Benefit Summary HTML

Pedestrian collision warning systems in vehicles generally work by warning drivers through auditory or visual alerts when pedestrians are detected in the vehicle path. However, these warnings often lack spatial information, so drivers need to further localize (i.e., recognize direction and distance of) approaching pedestrians to appropriately react. This study uses augmented reality (AR) heads up displays (HUDs) to answer two questions: (1) Can visual warnings on HUDs improve driver performance? (2) Can spatial information provided by AR HUDs change braking behavior?

Sixteen drivers were asked to drive a test vehicle in a parking lot and brake for crossing pedestrians with three pedestrian collision warning interface designs (no warning, HUD "BRAKE" sign, HUD virtual shadow enlarging as the vehicle approaches the pedestrian) and two levels of distance to pedestrians (near – 2.5 sec time to collision, far – 5 sec time to collision). The first runs used no warning signs to establish a baseline, the remaining conditions were then completed in an order to minimize learning effects. The location of road events was randomized and "no event" trials were randomly added to minimize anticipation of pedestrians.

The study analyzed deceleration profiles during each braking maneuver with dependent variables as reaction time, braking time, time to stop, maximum deceleration, and stopping distance. Data from 14 of the participants was analyzed using two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) to examine the effect of interface design and target distance.

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No
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Lesson Background HTML

Pedestrian collision warning systems in vehicles generally work by warning drivers through auditory or visual alerts when pedestrians are detected in the vehicle path. However, these warnings often lack spatial information, so drivers need to further localize (i.e., recognize direction and distance of) approaching pedestrians to appropriately react. This study uses augmented reality (AR) heads up displays (HUDs) to answer two questions: (1) Can visual warnings on HUDs improve driver performance? (2) Can spatial information provided by AR HUDs change braking behavior?

Sixteen drivers were asked to drive a test vehicle in a parking lot and brake for crossing pedestrians with three pedestrian collision warning interface designs (no warning, HUD "BRAKE" sign, HUD virtual shadow enlarging as the vehicle approaches the pedestrian) and two levels of distance to pedestrians (near – 2.5 sec time to collision, far – 5 sec time to collision). The first runs used no warning signs to establish a baseline, the remaining conditions were then completed in an order to minimize learning effects. The location of road events was randomized and "no event" trials were randomly added to minimize anticipation of pedestrians.

The study analyzed deceleration profiles during each braking maneuver with dependent variables as reaction time, braking time, time to stop, maximum deceleration, and stopping distance. Data from 14 of the participants was analyzed using two-way repeated measure analysis of variance (ANOVA) to examine the effect of interface design and target distance.

Pages
5
Publication Sort Date
Publisher
ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces
Result Type
Source ID
1560
Title
Look at Me: Augmented Reality Pedestrian Warning System Using an In-vehicle Volumetric Head Up Display
UNID
170E408CD6A43D5485257F85004E932B
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