Intelligent traffic signal systems can reduce average vehicle delay by 17 to 23 percent with 50 percent connected vehicle market penetration.
Simulation of system-wide benefits in Anthem, AZ and Chantilly, VA.
Made Public Date
02/21/2019

780

Anthem
Arizona
United States

324

Chantilly
Virginia
United States
Identifier
2019-01338
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Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS) Impacts Assessment

Summary Information

Dynamic Mobility Applications (DMA’s) Multi-Modal Intelligent Traffic Signal Systems (MMITSS) application bundle uses advanced communications and data from connected vehicle technology to facilitate efficient travel for various vehicle-types and pedestrians through signalized corridors.

A MMITSS prototype was developed and field tested featuring three components:

  • Intelligent Traffic Signal System (I-SIG)
  • Transit Signal Priority (TSP)
  • Freight Signal Priority (FSP)

The study assessed overall system-wide delay and throughput considering various forms of control and signal priority implemented in an isolated intersection or in a network environment.

METHODOLOGY

A VISSIM microscopic traffic simulation model was calibrated using field data to evaluate system-wide benefits of MMITSS. Field data included traffic count and turning movement data on six signalized intersections on Daisy Mountain Drive in Anthem Arizona, and six intersections on Route-50 in Chantilly, Virginia.

FINDINGS

The tables below excerpted from the source document show estimated system wide impacts at different volume capacity ratios (V/C) and CV technology penetration rates.

System-Wide Benefits of Arizona I-SIG (Reduction in Average Vehicle Delay)

Penetration Rate V/C (0.5) V/C (0.85)
I-SIG 25% CV 13.9% 11.5%
I-SIG 50% CV 17.3% 20.0%
I-SIG 75% CV 16.2% 20.6%

System-Wide Benefits of Virginia I-SIG (Reduction in Average Vehicle Delay)

Penetration Rate V/C (0.5) V/C (0.85)
I-SIG 25% CV 16.7% 35.5%
I-SIG 50% CV 24.1% 23.3%
I-SIG 75% CV 25.2% 23.0%
  • Maximum system-wide benefits from I-SIG were observed at V/C 0.85 with 75 percent CV on the Arizona network, and at V/C 0.85 with 25 percent CV on the Virginia network. I-SIG reduced average delay by up to 20.6 percent on the Arizona network and by up to 35.5 percent on the Virginia network.
  • Optimum TSP performance for transit vehicles was observed at V/C 0.85 on the Arizona network and at V/C 1.0 on the Virginia network. For equipped transit vehicles, TSP reduced average delay by up to 51.4 percent on the Arizona network and by up to 31.5 percent on the Virginia network.
  • The most beneficial condition for trucks was V/C 0.50 with 20 percent connected trucks for the Arizona network, and V/C 0.85 with 20 percent connected trucks for the Virginia network. For equipped trucks, FSP reduced average delay by up to 53.0 percent on the Arizona network and by up to 37.2 percent on the Virginia network.
  • The maximum truck benefit under TSP and FSP combination operation was observed at V/C 0.85 for the Arizona network and at V/C 0.50 for the Virginia network. For equipped trucks, MMITSS reduced average delay by up to 77.9 percent on the Arizona network and by up to 55.2 percent on the Virginia network.
Goal Areas
Deployment Locations